amyatishkin (amyatishkin) wrote,
amyatishkin
amyatishkin

Япония 1946-49 гг. в цвете. 10 часть, заключительная



1 часть | 2 часть | 3 часть | 4 часть | 5 часть | 6 часть | 7 часть | 8 часть | 9 часть

Немного пояснительного текста к фотоколлекции на английском. Кому надо - поймет, а так все по фотографиям уже догадались, что в коллекцию попадало.

[Who is Dr. Oliver L. Austin, Jr.]Dr. Oliver L. Austin, Jr. headed the Wildlife Branch of the Fisheries Division in the Natural Resources Section (NRS) for SCAP from September 4, 1946 to December 31, 1949. He was honored as one of only two members of the US Occupation of Japan who received a personal commendation for meritorious civilian service by General Douglas MacArthur. Austin implemented reforms of game laws and created wildlife sanctuaries as well as public hunting grounds to help conserve and manage Japan's wildlife and natural resources. During his nearly four years in Japan, Austin left behind almost 1,000 well-preserved color photographic slides of postwar Japan under reconstruction: highlights include American expatriate life, ordinary Japanese families in Tokyo and the countryside, and Japanese veterans purveying street entertainments.

The images reveal high artistic quality and composition while they provide a glimpse into an important era in US-Japan relations. Through his ornithological connections, Austin met and collaborated with deposed Japanese aristocrats who engaged in the study of birds as dilettantes and connoisseurs, including Prince Takatsukasa (head priest of the Meiji Shrine) and Marquis Yamashina Yoshimaro (founder of the Yamashina Institute for Ornithology). His son Tony, who served as the conversational English partner of Crown Prince Akihito, the current Emperor of Japan, donated this remarkable collection, which features rare color photos of Emperor Ahikito as a child, scenes of the grounds of the imperial palace, and shots of collateral members of the imperial family.

Dr. Oliver L. Austin, Jr. (1903-1988)

Recipient of the first doctorate in ornithology from Harvard University in 1929, Dr. Austin was a world-renowned authority on birds in the twentieth century. During his military service with the US Navy in the Western Pacific, he discovered two new bat species following “mopping-up” operations by the Marines. Military intelligence naturally classified locations for island landings during WWII, but Austin would name species he found on each island in letters to his wife, who would then call up Jim Greenway, the head of the Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ). Through categorizing rare bird species, he helped plot her husband’s precise location in the war.

Dr. Austin’s first postwar posting was as a Lieutenant Commander in the US Naval Reserve in US-occupied Korea near Suwon, where he ran the Central Agricultural Experiment Station on sericulture and cotton, and collected bird specimens in his spare time. He found a country demoralized by Japanese colonial rule (1910-1945), and ravaged by the exigencies of war from Japanese forces that had stripped their colony of natural resources for the conflict in Asia. Very few bird species of any kind remained since most were netted and eaten by a protein-starved population. The birds that were left could be found in socially marginalized areas laden with popular superstitions such as graveyards, temple grounds, or deep in the mountains. As a high-ranking officer, Austin received the aid of a local assistant named Kim, with whom he communicated in Japanese. A sizable number of the Korean bird specimens in the MCZ were actually prepared by Kim, who had been taught by Austin to skin and preserve them. Austin’s work in Korea culminated in his 1948 for the MCZ Bulletin entitled Birds of Korea.

In Korea, Dr. Austin attempted to salvage the remains of colonial Japanese scholarship on ornithology. Relevant materials were stacked in haphazard fashion in Seoul colonial archives, but he was able to retrieve some key texts on bird populations in northeast Asia. Here, he first encountered the work of some of the individuals he would later meet and collaborate with in occupied Japan. They also happened to be the deposed aristocratic elite, many of whom were Japan’s leading ornithologists, such as Yamashina Yoshimaro and Hachisuka Masauji. Austin later published Birds of Japan (1953) with Baron Kuroda Nagahisa (1916-2009).

Connections with Quaker English educator Elizabeth Vining and the Japanese aristocracy enabled Dr. Austin to meet with members of the imperial family, including Crown Prince Akihito, for whom his son Tony served as an English conversation partner. Hence, Tony lived a charmed life during his four years in Japan, which he spent hunting with Japanese and Italian aristocrats, playing monopoly and bridge with the future Japanese emperor, and visiting various country estates of Japanese nobles with his father, while receiving an expatriate education at the Tokyo American School.

Before his death, Dr. Austin served as Curator Emeritus of Ornithology at the Florida Museum of Natural History and retired in Gainesville, Florida.


Написано, что в Японии снято около тысячи фотографий, на самом деле в архиве выложено ≈750, из которых я отобрал 616. Пропущены точные дубли, совсем заваленные, случайно попавшие американские снимки, и всякое малозначимое для меня вида "Наша собака жрет какую-то гадость", "Чайки в полете", "Стюарт-индус подает завтрак на пароходе по пути из Японии" и т.п.

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Tags: in color, oliver austin, Япония
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